East London Area Guides

London’s East End is as culturally and historically rich a place as they come. Typically less expensive to live in than West London, this part of the city nonetheless has a great deal to offer. It is a place that is experiencing massive grown and regeneration, with areas like the Docklands becoming new centres of shopping, dining, and entertainment getting accommodation to match. While you can find Georgian and Victorian houses that survived the war, it is often the warehouse conversions and new builds that people think of when they consider moving to East London. With amenities like Victoria Park, good transport links, a Westfield shopping centre, and general revitalisation efforts, the relatively affordable housing in East London may turn out to be a bigger bargain than you anticipated.

Living in East London

AldersbrookExceptional4.6

Aldersbrook is an Edwardian housing estate within the Wanstead area. This little enclave is almost purely residential, but the larger area of Wanstead has a lot of amenities to offer its residents. Wanstead was recently voted one of the best places to live in Britain, and it's easy to see why. Located in Zone 4, and on two branches of the Central Line, transport links into Central London and the City are very good - and yet, this neighbourhood as a villagey feel with a strong community vibe. There are the conveniences of chain supermarkets, but also the pleasure of local, independent shops. It is a good place to raise a family, but also enjoyed by young couples. Attractive period property abounds, and is a relative bargain. And adding to the village charm is the abundance of green space - Wanstead Flats, Wanstead Park, and Epping Forest make it easy to forget that you've got a London postcode. 

BecktonAverage2.9

Beckton, formerly an industrial area dominated by Beckton Gasworks, has undergone massive changes in recent years. It is now largely residential, consisting mainly of new-build homes. Despite its residential character, the area also has a lot of local amenities, including numerous shopping centres, DLR stations and buses, and some green space. 

Bethnal GreenFabulous3.6

Bethnal Green is a lively East London neighbourhood that attracts a wide range of people. Appealing to everyone from artists and City workers to young families, the area is very diverse. Green space, good local amenities, good schools, and excellent transport links cater to the specialised needs of these populations. Bethnal Green has also remained more affordable than ins neighbours, like Hoxton and Shoreditch, and many who turn to this area because they were priced out of a place nearby are pleasantly surprised with what they find here. 

BlackwallAverage2.7

A former shipbuilding and repairing centre whose residential population had fallen and left behind high levels of social deprivation, Blackwall and Cubitt Town is now an increasingly affluent residential part of East London. The area is the site of increasing new luxury riverside development, including the tearing down and rebuilding of the brutalist Robin Hood Gardens estate.

BowFabulous3.7

Bow is a residential area of East London that has undergone much development in recent years, especially since the arrival of the London 2012 Olympics. With good transport links, access to green space, and local amenities, the area attracts everyone from students, young professional singles, couples, and sharers to young families. 

Canary WharfFabulous3.1

Canary Wharf is known for its role in London's financial industries, but it is also a feature of the London skyline and a thriving residential quarter. With good transport links and local amenities including restaurants, shops, and bars as well as the riverfront and Mudchute country park, this area appeals to a wide range of people. Canary Wharf has a strong rental market that attracts overseas residents and young professionals seeking trendy penthouse apartments in particular, but you'll also find the odd Victorian terrace housing a family. The area is set to benefit from even more development, including more housing and Crossrail. 

Canning TownFabulous3.0

A former docklands district, Canning Town is the beneficiary of a £3.7 billion regeneration project and thousands of new homes. People ranging from young professionals to families are drawn to Canning Town for its local amenities, including shopping, dining, and entertainment, in addition to its waterfront location and excellent transport links. This area also remains, for London, relatively affordable - but it's likely that won't last long as more people awaken to the benefits of living in E16. 

ChingfordExceptional4.3

Chingford is a quiet suburb on the edge of London, bordering on Essex. The area has loads of historic buildings, incluuding Queen Elizabeth's Hunting Lodge, which was built for King Henry VIII in 1543. Epping Forest, London's largest park at 600 acres of woodland, is on the doorstep of Chingford, making it feel like a country retreat despite being located within Travelcard Zone 5 and having good connections to Central London. 

Cubitt TownAverage2.6

A former shipbuilding and repairing centre whose residential population had fallen and left behind high levels of social deprivation, Blackwall and Cubitt Town is now an increasingly affluent residential part of East London. The area is the site of increasing new luxury riverside development, including the tearing down and rebuilding of the brutalist Robin Hood Gardens estate.

East HamFabulous3.7

With excellent transport links, abundant green space, and good local amenities, it's easy to see why families are attracted to East Ham - and that's before considering the relatively reasonable property prices. East Ham's housing stock is mainly Victorian and Edwardian terraces, which can be bought for fractions of what similar homes would cost elsewhere in London. It is very ethnically and religiously diverse, and is home to a large population of children, and residents feel there is a sense of community.

Forest GateExceptional4.0

Forest Gate is a long-overlooked part of East London with good transport links, excellent green space and schools, and increasingly good local amenities - but the best part is the affordable period housing. Double-fronted Victorian 3- and 4-bed houses go for hundreds of thousands of pounds less here than in nearby places like Wanstead, though Forest Gate is also bordered by Wanstead Flats. First-time buyers or those looking to climb the ladder from flat to house are flocking to this area, and prices are rising, also due in part to the imminent arrival of Crossrail.

HackneyFabulous3.4

Until recently, Hackney was one of the least desirable places to live in London. But in the last 20 years, prices in Hackney have risen the fastest of anywhere in London, due to extensive regeneration that has brought new amenities from a library to a Picturehouse multiplex cinema, in addition to a new crop of restaurants, cafes, bars, and luxury clothing shops. Hackney has now fully transformed into a trendy place to live, and truly has something to offer everyone from its range of housing styles to its shops.

Hackney WickExceptional4.3

The Wick, as it is fondly known, used to be considered run-down but is now considered by many to be the artistic centre of London. With the River Lea, the Olympic Park, Hackney Marsh, and Victoria Park encircling the area, it has a great deal of lovely open space. And as the area has improved, so have transport links, including the Overground. 

HaggerstonFabulous3.3

Surrounded by many of the most popular places in East London, Haggerston has been overlooked in comparison. This neighbourhood is something of an oasis amongst the trendy Dalston, Shoreditch, and Hoxton destinations that are within walking distance, and enjoys a laid-back atmosphere and nice scenery, including Regent's Canal and the stretch of independent cafes and restaurants that line it. 

Hale EndExceptional4.0

Hale End lies just beyond the North Circular, and is in many ways a typical but nice outer London suburb. Mainly terraces house the population of married, older working professionals and their children, and there is good access to green and open space and schools in addition to activities and clubs geared at them. Transport links aren't outstanding, and neither is the nightlife - but this tends to suit the people who live here just fine. 

HomertonFabulous3.3

As with many of the areas around the Olympic Park, Homerton has benefitted a lot from regeneration that has poured into the area. Formerly down-at-heel and poorly connected, the area's prospects are looking up - the Overground has made this area a lot easier to get to and from. The area has always had a lot of greenery, with Hackney Marshes, Victoria Park, and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, and its share of local and independent shops, pubs, and restaurants.

Isle of DogsAverage2.7

Until very recently, the Isle of Dogs and its neighbouring areas were industrial wastelands. Formerly surrounded by water and cut off from the rest of London, it now boasts good transport links with the DLR and the Jubilee Line as well as the Overground all within easy reach, and finally feels like the Zone 2 area it is. As more new housing and local amenities come to the area, the Isle of Dogs will only continue to become a more desirable place to live. 

Lea BridgeFabulous3.7

Like many parts of East London, Lea Bridge has long been thought of as being deprived and poorly connected. However, its station has recently reopened, after three decades of being shut, and regeneration of surrounding areas like Clapton and Stratford has begun to have knock-on effects in Lea Bridge. With good schools, green space and waterways, and period homes all available at prices that are a bargain by London standards, there's every reason to consider making Lea Bridge your home. 

LeytonExceptional4.1

Living in one of London's most affordable areas doesn't necessarily mean compromising on price - especially in Leyton. Though house prices and rents are pretty low here, comparatively speaking, the area isn't short on local amenities. It must be said that the Olympics and the arrival of Westfield Stratford contributed to and hastened the area's improvement, but some aspects - like the abundant green space and attractive Victorian terraces - were here all along. Leyton is favoured by families, who appreciate the good schools and villagey feel, as well as by young professionals, who appreciate the easy commute into the City and Central London. 

LeytonstoneExceptional4.0

Leytonstone is a part of East London that represents the best of the countryside and London. Surrounded to the North and East by the vast green spaces of the Wanstead Flats and Epping Forest, and with good road links out of London, Leytonstone is nonetheless in Zone 3 and on the Central Line with a short commute into Central London. The area also has good local amenities and schools, and - miraculously - remains relatively affordable, especially compared with nearby areas like Wanstead.

LimehouseFabulous3.0

Located between the City and Canary Wharf is an unexpected residential area. Benefiting from the riverfront and a mixture of lovely Georgian houses and modern developments, as well as its location, Limehouse is a hidden gem of London. The area has, like much of its surroundings, benefitted hugely from regeneration in recent years. It is a peaceful and affordable enclave, compared to neighbouring areas like Canary Wharf, and is favoured by bankers.

Little IlfordFabulous3.3

Little Ilford is a very diverse area that lies along the North Circular, to the South of Wanstead Flats. It has historical significance, but has since lost its identity, and is often lumped together with neighbouring Manor Park. The area has a lot of green space, a school that gets excellent results, and affordable terraced houses with decent transport links. It does also have high levels of deprivation, and lacks entertainment facilities. Ilford proper lies across the River Roding (and the North Circular). 

Lower ClaptonFabulous3.7

Like many parts of East London, Lower Clapton has long been thought of as being deprived and poorly connected. However, Lea Bridge station has recently reopened, after three decades of being shut, and regeneration of surrounding areas like Clapton and Stratford has begun to have knock-on effects in this area. With good schools, green space and waterways, and period homes all available at prices that are a bargain by London standards, there's every reason to consider making Lower Clapton your home.

Manor ParkFabulous3.9

A multicultural, affordable East London neighbourhood, Manor Park has historically attracted large populations of Asian residents. The area is diverse, however, with growing Eastern European communities, and more people moving to the area to benefit from attainable Victorian terraces, green space, and transport links that are good now but will be great with the arrival of Crossrail. 

Mile EndExceptional4.0

Mile End is an area of East London that attracts a wide range of people. From students at Queen Mary University and young City professionals to families, those who move to this area enjoy a combination of good access to parks and attractive period properties and proximity to trendy East London locales like Whitechapel as well as great transport links. The area has a good range of local shops and restaurants catering to the mixed community of residents.

MillwallFabulous3.1

Millwall neighbours Canary Wharf, which is known for its role in London's financial industries, but is also a feature of the London skyline and a thriving residential quarter. With good transport links and local amenities including restaurants, shops, and bars as well as the riverfront and Mudchute country park, this area appeals to a wide range of people. This area has a strong rental market that attracts overseas residents and young professionals seeking trendy penthouse apartments in particular, but you'll also find the odd Victorian terrace housing a family. The area is set to benefit from even more development, including more housing and Crossrail. 

North WoolwichFabulous3.0

A formerly isolated area, this waterfront part of East London now boasts pretty good transport links, thanks to the DLR extension. This area, like much of the borough, has also historically had high levels of deprivation, but change is underway. Regeneration, which includes improvements to the Royal Victoria Gardens, the Pier Parade, and the Pier Road Open Space, continues to have a positive impact on this area. Many new homes are being built in this area as well. 

Old FordFabulous3.6

Old Ford is a small locality in the north of Bow, which benefits from being surrounded by canals and parks. The area is more dominated by council-built flats than other parts of Bow, but has the same good transport links, local amenities, and affordability that the larger neighbourhood enjoys. Those who live here are likely to find it is a good area for value for money.

PoplarFabulous3.3

Badly scarred by World War II, Poplar has made a big resurgence and is now a thriving residential area once more. While it does suffer from a lack of green space and attractive period property, the area is centrally located - in Zone 2 - and has excellent transport links and some of the last remaining affordable property in London. Many who live here are young families, and there are a lot of amenities geared toward families in the area, including a wide selection of schools. 

ShacklewellAverage2.9

Shacklewell was once a defined village with a manor house, but is now a more nebulous part of Hackney. Located between Dalston and Stoke Newington, residents tend to identify with either of those locations, depending on whether their postcode is N16 (Stoke Newington) or E8 (Dalston), rather than saying they live in Shacklewell. The area does not have its own ward, either, dividing what would be Shacklewell amongst Stoke Newington Central, Dalston, and Hackney Downs wards. A significant chunk of the area, however, lies within Stoke Newington Central ward, and that is a useful reference point for understanding census data related to Shacklewell.

ShadwellFabulous3.3

Shadwell is an East London neighbourhood with a lot of character. It features a mix of old and new properties as well as stylish conversions, and benefits from being near the Thames and close to Central London, with excellent transport links. Regeneration is happening fast here, and the area's rough reputation is fading, though its diversity and sense of community remain. 

ShoreditchAverage2.9

A creative Mecca located within walking distance of the City of London, this somewhat-newly upscale neighbourhood is full of artists, media professionals, and financiers. It’s a young, hip area that hasn’t yet lost its edge as property prices have skyrocketed, and it has staying power for those who purchased old warehouses to convert into lofts a few decades ago. For galleries, artisan foods, and a great night out, Shoreditch is the place.

SilvertownFabulous3.3

A formerly isolated area, this waterfront part of East London now boasts pretty good transport links, thanks to the DLR extension. Silvertown used to be an indistrial district, though that is set to change. This area, like much of the borough, has also historically had high levels of deprivation, but change is underway. Regeneration, which includes improvements to the Royal Victoria Gardens, the Pier Parade, and the Pier Road Open Space, continues to have a positive impact on this area. Many new homes are being built in this area as well. 

SnaresbrookExceptional4.3

Snaresbrook is a lovely, quiet suburb neighbouring Epping Forest. It has a significant population of pensioners, and the area is known for its villagey feel and sense of community. However, it is just inside Zone 4, and has superb transport links with the Central Line accessible at more than one station. With lovely parks, great pubs, and attractive houses, however, you may never want to leave. 

South HackneyExceptional4.0

South Hackney is a lovely enclave nestled into the curve of Victoria Park, the Regent's Canal and London Fields. The area has a lot of local amenities, including independent businesses, and a good selection of property types ranging from large Victorian houses to new-build flats. Transport links are good, despite the lack of a Tube station in the neighbourhood itself. South Hackney's balance between peaceful parks and trendy East London appeals particularly to young professionals. 

South WoodfordExceptional4.3

South Woodford is a best of both worlds kind of place - it's within Zone 4 of London, and has great transport links into the centre including the Central Line, but it also has good green space and larger, semi-detached houses. It also has a great range of local amenities, including a Waitrose and several independent shops. The neighbourhood appeals to a wide range of people, including families - and it has staying power and a sense of community. 

Upper ClaptonFabulous3.1

Upper Clapton lies along the River Lea and can be spotted on a map because of its proximity to the river, the reservoirs, and several parks - including Clapton Common. The area is very diverse, and is notably home to a great many children. Much of the housing is of the high-rise 1960s tower block variety, however, and transport links aren't great - there's no Tube - so this area is a relative bargain. 

Upton ParkExceptional4.0

Upton Park is a conveniently located suburb with a lot to offer. With good access to green space, good transport links, and good entertainment options in the surrounding area, it's no wonder that Upton Park is popular with families - but it is a surprise that despite these advantages, this neighbourhood is fairly inexpensive to buy a house in. The area is home to a diverse community, and also receives a lot of visitors from all over the world during West Ham games.

WallendFabulous3.1

Wallend, sometimes spelt as Wall End, is an East London suburb alongside the River Roding. The area's residents are largely Asian or Asian British, with established Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi communities, and the most Sri Lankans of anywhere in London. Wallend is still home to some light industry near the river, but it is not flourishing. 

WalthamstowExceptional4.7

Walthamstow is a villagey, arty, and family-friendly Zone 3 suburb. The population is mixed in many ways, with an ethnically diverse population and residents ranging from young City professionals to families. The area is very well-connected, by Tube, rail, and road, and has a good balance of urban and leafy parts. Walthamstow is also a cultural hotspot, with a good range of local amenities that includes a thriving nightlife. The biggest surprise, therefore, is that Walthamstow is a relatively affordable part of London in which to live. 

WansteadExceptional4.6

Wanstead was recently voted one of the best places to live in Britain, and it's easy to see why. Located in Zone 4, and on two branches of the Central Line, transport links into Central London and the City are very good - and yet, this neighbourhood as a villagey feel with a strong community vibe. There are the conveniences of chain supermarkets, but also the pleasure of local, independent shops. It is a good place to raise a family, but also enjoyed by young couples. Attractive period property abounds, and is a relative bargain. And adding to the village charm is the abundance of green space - Wanstead Flats, Wanstead Park, and Epping Forest make it easy to forget that you've got a London postcode. 

WappingFabulous3.6

Wapping is a small, residential area with narrow cobbled streets that lies along North side of the Thames, just East of Tower Bridge. The area has a core community, despite its location near the mega-commuter hub that is the City, and has a strong maritime character due to its location along the Thames. The small neighbourhood isn't home to any large parks - but its waterside location, transport links, and characterful pubs suit the working-age adults who mainly inhabit the area.

WhitechapelFabulous3.1

Whitechapel is and has always been home to a diverse population, welcoming immigrants fleeing various ill fortune over the centuries. What has changed over the years is this area's fortunes - famously the degenerated London of Dickens novels, the area is now trendy and sought-after, with the accompanying rise in property prices. The area's urban cool - cafes, art, and nightlife - attracts young professionals, especially City workers and creative types, but not generally families, who tend to move away in search of more green space.

WoodfordExceptional4.1

Just outside the North Circular lies the suburb of Woodford - an exceptionally quiet, rural-seeming London suburb. Despite the area's quiet appearance, several very notable people - including Sylvia Pankhurst, Winston Churchill, and members of Depeche Mode - have lived here. Still, families are drawn to the area because of its large, often attractive houses with gardens, the surrounding green space, and the top-notch schools. Transport links are good, too, with two Central Line stations and exceptionally good road links. 

Browse by map